Author Interviews

Author Interview with Andrew Saxsma

Posted by on Jul 2, 2013 | 0 comments

Author interviews are back! I promised you a return to more variable content and this is me coming through, though a bit more slowly than I’d hoped. Today I’ve got an interview with author Andrew Saxsma. His book is science fiction and is called Lonely Moon. Here’s the blurb: Earth lies in ruins, destroyed by an unknown enemy. Humanity flees their burning homeworld, seeking a safe place to hide before they can be hunted down and eradicated. Alliance Captain Michael Hane watches helplessly while his wife and unborn child fall victim to the random slaughter of Earth. With time running out, he is burdened by the last bits of humanity to find a way to stop this menace before it wipes the galaxy clean of every last human being. And now, on to the interview: 1. What’s the first word of your book? (You can exclude articles, pronouns or prepositions.) The first word of Lonely Moon is ‘Captain’.   2. Tell me something about your book that I can’t find in the blurb. Lonely Moon is about one man’s journey, but what you won’t see in the blurb is where this man’s journey goes.  Captain Hane’s story deals heavily with the concept of humanity, what it means to be human, how dangerous emotions can be, but also how unique those emotions make us.  This journey examines us with a lens and lays bare our faults and celebrates our resilience as Hane tries to stop our extinction.   3. In one word, describe your main character. (You can expand afterwards, but limit your initial response to one word.) Vulnerable.  Captain Hane is vulnerable.  He witnesses the death of his wife and unborn daughter while he stands helpless to stop it.  He’s strong, but his strength is limited by that vulnerability and his inability to make peace with what he saw.   4. Where does your book take place? Tell me about why you picked that location. Lonely Moon takes Captain Hane everywhere from a futuristic New York City, to an established human colony on a foreign moon, and all the way to the edges of the galaxy.  These locations were all crucial to the story, and to quote one of my characters, Leo, “Strange things exist on the edges of the galaxy”.  It is this unknown, this ambiguity that fuels the story along as Hane unravels the mystery of what has truly befallen Mankind.   5. Tell me about your favorite character that you’ve written. Oh brother.  I don’t know if I should pick a favorite (my others might be jealous).  I will say, though, that Captain Hane would have to be one of my most well-rounded, and well-balanced.  His true character flaw is also humanity’s saving grace.  Thus, weakness is strength, so to speak.  He’s sad, he’s mad, he’s tired, he’s adrenaline-pumped.  He’s a lot of things, and he displays those things quite adequately throughout his story, and, I would dare say, he does so with complete believability.   6. What’s your favorite verb? That’s a tough one.  There’s so many to choose from.  My gut is telling me ‘Imagine’, because that’s what I do on a daily basis.  I imagine characters, stories, interactions, all on a daily basis, and then I record them, as I see them.   7. What’s the last book you read? The last book I read was Stephen King’s IT, and it was my third time reading it in the past seven years.  It’s truly an inspiring story, not only from a plot standpoint, but also for its amazing characterization.  It’s really one of...

Read More

Author Interview with Julianne Snow

Posted by on Mar 26, 2012 | 0 comments

Today’s interview comes from an author by the name of Julianne Snow. Her new book, Days with the Undead, is a zombie survival journal. Check out the blurb: It’s a journal of survival. Five people set out to escape the Undead who have risen too close to home. Join the emotional and physical struggle as they began on the third day after the awakening of Brooks VanReit, as they are recorded from the point of view of Julie, a former pathologist and part-time survivalist. Each entry is geared toward helping those who want to help themselves and maybe give a few that don’t a swift kick in the ass. Join our group of survivors on their journey through these Days with the Undead. And now, on to the interview: What’s the first word of your book? (You can exclude articles, pronouns or prepositions.) The first word of Days with the Undead: Book One is “close”.   Tell me something about your book that I can’t find in the blurb. That’s a very interesting question… It’s a book about choices. You can choose to live or you can choose to die. Each of your actions is a micro decision closer to either one of those extremes. It’s also a book written completely from the perspective of the protagonist and is told through narratives only.   In one word, describe your main character. (You can expand afterwards, but limit your initial response to one word.) Resilient. Julie, the main character is definitely resilient. She is also compassionate to a certain degree, intense, and yet vulnerable.   Where does your book take place? Tell me about why you picked that location. The book starts out in Toronto, a place that I am very familiar about. For the bulk of the book, the main group of characters are on the move. They travel through part of Canada and the United States looking for a safe haven. The landscape of the book is very different from the one that you might expect to see if you were to drive the same path today. The human world has faced its own extinction and as the social landscape changes, so does the physical landscape. The subject and genre dictate that the landscape had to change and with hordes of the Undead beginning to take up residence on every street corner, it’s not a friendly place.   Tell me about your favorite character that you’ve written. I have enjoyed many of the characters that I have written. In Days with the Undead: Book One, my favorite characters to bring to life were Lily and Liam. Nothing speaks to hope more than the laughter of children; even children that have lived through terrible events. Of my other works, I enjoyed writing Stella, a character in my story for Sirens Call Publications anthology – Childhood Nightmares: Under The Bed. Stella is a young girl plagued with terrible nightmares; a hard topic to properly flesh out while maintaining the innocence of childhood.   What’s your favorite verb? Infecting. It can be used in so many different ways.   What’s the last book you read? Does my own count? The last full length book that I read was The Serpent’s Tale by Ariana Franklin. That was some time ago now as most of what I’ve been reading lately have been shorts.   Who was your favorite fictional character as a child? It would definitely be Princess Ozma from L. Frank Baum’s books about the wonderful world of Oz. I loved reading about her as a child and sometimes, I even dreamed...

Read More

Author Interview with Emily Ward

Posted by on Feb 1, 2012 | 2 comments

Today I have something a little unusual for you. I don’t usually host much YA here, because I write Adult books, but I’ve made an exception for the author who I’m featuring today. Emily Ward is a friend I made over at Critique Circle who is a wonderful writer, and a great peer to trade chapters with. Her first novel, Promising Light, is an inventive fantasy story rife with magic and shapeshifters. Read the first chapter here. Here’s the blurb: Grace began a secret courtship with Dar for the thrill of doing something against her father, the king’s general. She hadn’t planned on falling in love with him. When Dar suddenly leaves her, she searches for answers, reluctant to let him go. Everyone seems determined to keep the truth from her—until she’s kidnapped by Dar’s family. They’re shape changers who claim she can break a curse set on them ten years ago by the Protectors, a group of noblemen determined to stifle magic in the name of safety. Torn between two worlds, Grace isn’t sure who to trust. If the curse endures, Dar’s family could die out forever. But to help them, she’ll have to leave behind everything she knows. Book One of The Protectors Series. Set two years after The Protectors prequels. Now, on to our interview: 1. What’s the first word of your book? (You can exclude articles, pronouns or prepositions.) Grace 2. Tell me something about your book that I can’t find in the blurb. Although it has a few fantasy cliches — a prophecy and a quest — it has a magic system that’s unique. The only typical sorcery may be the Mahri family who can brew potions and enchant physical objects, but the reader gets the chance to see a lot of interesting magic. I think it’s great, but of course I’m biased. 😉 3. In one word, describe your main character. (You can expand afterwards, but limit your initial response to one word.) Determined. When Grace wants something, she doesn’t give up! 4. Where does your book take place? Tell me about why you picked that location. It takes place in an Earth-like fantasy world. Same seasons, same time system and all that, just different countries with magic. I wanted my world to have its own history and world rules (concerning the magical families) but I still wanted the familiarity of seasons, 24-hour days, 7-day weeks, etc. It has some other neat places, too, which I’ll talk about later on in the tour. 5. Tell me about your favorite character that you’ve written. My favorite character in Promising Light is probably Dar. I’m really tempted to say Grace because I’ve spent so much time in her head, but I loved slowly revealing Dar. At first, readers may not know what to make of him, but as the plot moves along, I’m hoping readers fall in love with him as much as Grace and I did! He cares so much for Grace; he’s clever and diplomatic; he’s spirited while still being level-headed and patient with people. He was really fun to write. 6. What’s your favorite verb? I like the verb ‘reveal.’ I just used it, actually! It just rolls off the tongue and the meaning can be both abstract and literal. 7. What’s the last book you read? The Reckoning by Kelley Armstrong. It’s the last book in her Darkest Powers trilogy. I really enjoyed her young adult books, and I can’t wait for The Calling to come out! 8. Who was your favorite fictional character as a child? I went searching for...

Read More

Author Interview with Barry Napier

Posted by on Jan 24, 2012 | 0 comments

Today I have an interview with author Barry Napier. He’s here to share the first in a paranormal/horror series called Everything Theory. Check out the blurbage: Gabe is a disenchanted twenty year-old that has been dragged down for most of his life by the bizarre legacy his deceased father left behind. At the age of seventeen, Gabe was contacted by government employees that once worked with his father, offering him an outrageous salary if he would take part in an effort to revitalize his father’s work. Bit by bit, Gabe discovers that the work his father was involved in was incredibly strange. His father was viewed by his peers as a mad scientist of sorts, dabbling in controversial projects concerning genetics manipulation, advanced space exploration, time travel, and ESP. Cold Compass, the first book in the Everything Theory series, opens as Gabe is tasked with his first assignment as an unofficial member of a shadow organization known as the Center for Scientific Anomalous Research (CSAR). With the assistance of a CSAR official posing as an FBI agent, Gabe travels to the small town of Hasper, North Carolina where people are being killed by an ancient evil that lurks beneath the town. As if that wasn’t bad enough, Gabe learns that it could all very well be the result of one of his father’s failed studies. Along the way, Gabe must also contend with the fact that he is beginning to see ghosts and is being hunted down by an enigmatic figure that calls himself Garrison Sleet. As he slowly unravels the mysteries of his father, Gabe slowly understands that even the evil lurking beneath Hasper is tied to not only his father’s work, but to some integral part of him as well. Onwards, the interview! 1. What’s the first word of your book? (You can exclude articles, pronouns or prepositions.) Dog. 2. Tell me something about your book that I can’t find in the blurb. The main character, a 20 year-old named Gabe, is a fan of ambient music and keeps an iPod on his person at all times.  He’s also something of a smart-ass. There is also a reference to Brian Eno, which I nearly omitted out of fear that many people may not know who he is.  But I left it in there because if you don’t know who Brian Eno is, you damn well should. 3. In one word, describe your main character. (You can expand afterwards, but limit your initial response to one word.) Sarcastic. 4. Where does your book take place? Tell me about why you picked that location. It starts out in Washigton DC because it sort of had to (it deals, in part, with the FBI and CIA).  But the majority of the book takes place in the fictional town of Hasper.  It’s a secluded little town tucked away in the forests of rural North Carolina.  It’s the perfect place for unspeakable horrors to lurk around. 5. Tell me about your favorite character that you’ve written. I could cop out here and say the character of Gabe from Everything Theory. But his story hasn’t been completely told yet (there will be 4 more books).  If I am going from everything I have ever written, I think I’d have to go with Jason Melhor, the leading role in my novel The Masks of Our Fathers. 6. What’s your favorite verb? Glisten. 7. What’s the last book you read? Burden, Kansas by Alan Ryker 8. Who was your favorite fictional character as a child? Orko from He-Man and the Masters of the Universe. 9....

Read More

Author Interview with Suzanne Robb

Posted by on Jan 22, 2012 | 0 comments

Please welcome to my little corner of the web, author Suzanne Robb. She’s got an interesting book to share, a short story collection by the name of Were-wolves, Apocalypses, and Genetic Mutation Oh my! Take a gander at the blurb: In the opening story Welcome to the Future, a teenager feels he has no place in life. His parents and school principal agree. He crosses paths with a doctor who has stolen the DNA of some of the smartest people both dead and alive, and injects it into the brain of the willing teenager with disastrous results In The Moonlight Killer, a man takes a shortcut home only to find himself attacked by a wolf. In a drunken stupor he decides to bite the wolf back and sets in motion a whole new mythology. Finally, B.I.T.E. is the story of a dysfunctional family as they try to fend off the impending apocalypse. They fight giant decayed squirrels, cobra sized men, and randomly assembled body parts, bickering the whole way to the end of the world. And now, on to the good stuff: 1. What’s the first word of your book? (You can exclude articles, pronouns or prepositions.) Pulp, okay it really isn’t pulp, but wouldn’t that be a neat word to start a story with? The first word is actually “Blink.” 2. Tell me something about your book that I can’t find in the blurb. The book is a collection of three stories, one of which goes against traditional were-wolf myth and alters it with interesting consequences. 3. In one word, describe your main character. (You can expand afterwards, but limit your initial response to one word.) Since there are three stories I will use three words, one for each story in order of how they appear. –   Idiot –   Disconnected –   Angry 4. Where does your book take place? Tell me about why you picked that location. The stories do not take place in specific area, except one that takes place in the future if that counts. I chose not to pick certain locations because the stories themselves did not have to rely on a geographic location to lend support to them. 5. Tell me about your favorite character that you’ve written. My favorite character I have ever written is the lead character in my novel Z-Boat. Her name is Ally, and she is strong, level-headed, but also emotional and fragile. She is a bit of everything so people can relate to her. 6. What’s your favorite verb? Geez, only one? I guess it would have to be – orated. I think it is a great verb, but have yet to find a way to use it so it does not sound pompous. 7. What’s the last book you read? Jasper Fforde’s One of our Thursday’s is Missing. I love him as a writer; he has such a rich imagination. Any person who enjoys writing and or reading needs to check him out. 8. Who was your favorite fictional character as a child? I am guessing you mean non-comic characters, so I would have to go with Aslan from The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe. I cried at his sacrifice and wanted to be as wise and noble as him. 9. Tell me about an event that contributed to your decision to become a writer. I have had inklings all my life. As a child I thought it was fun when friends were over to write books together. I enjoyed reading over going out with friends all throughout high school and college. Kept a journal and notes...

Read More

Author Interview with Susan Helene Gottfried

Posted by on Jan 15, 2012 | 5 comments

I’ve got an interview today with a wonderful lady I met while doing the Pink Snowbunnies in Hell Flash Fiction Anthology. She wrote a clever tale about hellbunnies attacking some wayward Rock Stars with killer snowballs. As you might imagine, she’s quite inventive. Please welcome to my little corner of the webiverse, Susan Helene Gottfried. Susan writes stories about Rock Stars and she’s got a few out now that you can look through here. Like many of my author friends, she’s a great twitter buddy, so I encourage you to follow her there. And now, on to the interview! 1. What’s the first word of your book? (You can exclude articles, pronouns or prepositions.) “Motherfucker.” (Trevor’s Song) 2. Tell me something about your book that I can’t find in the blurb. Trevor initially comes off as being annoying, but before you’re halfway through, you’ll become his biggest supporter. He’s that awesome. 3. In one word, describe your main character. (You can expand afterwards, but limit your initial response to one word.) Complicated 4. Where does your book take place? Tell me about why you picked that location. I created a fictional city, Riverview, so I had full artistic license to put things where they don’t necessarily belong. Haven’t you ever read a book set in a city you either live in or know really well, only to be upset because the shoe store isn’t where you were an hour ago? I wanted to avoid that at all costs. Thus, Riverview, USA. 5. Tell me about your favorite character that you’ve written. Oh, it has to be Trevor. He’s so much fun to write. Trevor has an irrverence that, combined with a brutal honesty, lets him get away with things very few people in real life would be able to. 6. What’s your favorite verb? Umm. Hmm. I don’t think I have a favorite verb. There are just too many to choose from, and they are so utterly tailored to the situation, it’s hard to pick a favorite. 7. What’s the last book you read? Jennifer Estep’s Tangled Threads. I’ve been a huge fan of Jennifer’s since I won a copy of Karma Girl, her debut, in an online contest. 8. Who was your favorite fictional character as a child? Lessa, from Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonflight (and others). Here’s a link to an interview I gave in 2009 all about how Lessa influenced me. http://aartichapati.blogspot.com/2009/11/rosies-riveters-susan-lessa.html 9. Tell me about an event that contributed to your decision to become a writer. Well, you see, I was born, and my fate was sealed at that moement… Seriously. I joke that my being a writer is a birth defect, but the truth is that if this is a birth defect, I am one lucky woman. 10. What would you tell past you, if you could send a letter back in time? Stop being afraid, and go for it. With gusto and no reservations. And to work, work, work and write, write,...

Read More
Page 1 of 41234